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Just wrote a letter to Members of European Parliament from six countries asking them to reject Article 13. Two of them host my projects and I just like other four. I honestly believe things like Copyright Directive have global impact no matter where you live. You can write your own letter.

It is a bit too long and certainly not perfect.
Subj: Concerning Copyright Reform and Article 13

Dear Member of the European Parliament!

To make things clear from the start - I am not one of your constituents as I live in Russia. However recent developments concerning Article 13 of the copyright Directive will have global impact which will also directly affect me so I decided to reach out.

You are probably aware of the critique of Article 13. While these proposals might be acceptable to large platforms they will decimate smaller social services because the cost of implementing upload filters will be prohibitive. Also these technologies will have to be outsourced to existing Big Data giants (mostly US based corporations) which will not just raise costs but also affect independence of social services forced to use them.

But I am pretty sure you are already aware of all that.

What I am more worried about is the precedent EU is about to create. Let me be frank - these days EU is beacon of progress and humanitarian rights. When it comes to freedom, privacy, social rights the world looks at you. Article 13 goes against these values. If it gets implemented governments of the rest of the world will see it as a green light to follow with even harder censorship and other restrictions of freedom of speech and expression. And they will already have the technology pioneered by Article 13 compliance - which won't be working good, which will misfire, which will be expensive and most likely under control of corporations like Google and Facebook. And as recent history of my country shows - if there is a restrictive control tool in place, it will be misused at one point or another.

Also there will be economic consequences for European IT companies. Right now a lot of projects are hosted in EU because of legal stability and respect of human rights Europe provides. With Article 13 in place it will change and these projects will move out to minimize potential liability. I am hosting two Internet projects in EU space myself, one in Germany and one in Italy. Please think what makes European hosting companies different from the rest. Also consider the fact that currently there is very little pirated material openly hosted by them - EU companies are known for low tolerance for piracy.

Please consider the overwhelming amount of critique towards Article 13. A good selection of points is here: https://saveyourinternet.eu/statements/

As a part of World Wide Web community I ask you to reject Article 13 of the copyright Directive.

Sincerely Yours,
Alexander
#article13 #EU #copyrightreform #CensorshipMachine #SaveYourInternet #digitalresistance #copyright #privacy #freedom #activism
 

European Copyright Reform: Article 13 puts alternative social networks at risk


If you live in the European Union, you have probably heard about the planned European Copyright Reform, and you are probably aware of its controversial Article 13.

The so-called Proposal for a Directive on copyright in the Digital Single Market intends to introduce new regulations around copyright. Article 13 would add new liability rules for online content-sharing service providers. While previously, providers could act on content that infringed copyright upon receiving a notice, the proposed regulations would render providers accountable for content as soon as it has been uploaded.

Effectively, this would put providers into a position where they have to implement strict upload filters to prevent users from uploading content that may infringe on someone else's copyright. This is dangerous, and it puts free speech, the diversity of opinions, and the internet as a whole at risk.

Article 13 previously contained rules to exclude platforms younger than three years, generating revenue of less than €10 million or with fewer than 5 million active users. Last week, however, a new draft was published, and the proposal now only excludes platforms matching all three of those conditions.

This is shocking. If Article 13 became a reality, everyone who operates a platform for users to publish content for more than three years would be 100% liable for everything happening on that platform, including content the operators are not even aware of. This makes operating an alternative social network effectively impossible.

For more details about the planned copyright reform, and information on how you can help, please check out saveyourinternet.eu. This does not concern just diaspora\* or your other favorite alternative social network. This concerns everyone. This is about health of the internet. Please #SaveYourInternet and fight against the #CensorshipMachine.

For reference, you will find below an open letter from diappora\* core team member Dennis Schubert, sent to those members of the European Parliament who currently support Article 13.
Dear Member of the European Parliament

The proposed Directive on copyright in the Digital Single Market has been the topic of discussions for many months now. In spite of many debates on this matter, not much progress has been made to address concerns of many respected experts, including many NGOs and even the United Nations' Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression, David Kaye[1]. According to my information, you are in the group of members of the European Parliament currently in favour of supporting this proposal, which is why I am reaching out to you to request you to reconsider the proposal, and especially consider the impact Article 13 will have on the Internet.

I am writing to you as a citizen of the European Union, but I am also reaching out to represent the many users and engineers behind alternative social networks. I am the project lead of diaspora*[2], an alternative, distributed social network based on free and open-source software. Together with similar projects such as Mastodon and Friendica, the world of alternative social media reaches over 2.5 million users on more than 4000 servers, including citizens who are part of your constituency.

Until now, the European Union has been seen as the epicentre of many efforts to build and maintain alternatives to large networks such as Facebook and Twitter. Many of these projects, their developers, and users are citizens of the European Union, and our projects enjoy great popularity among people as they are seen as privacy-friendly, local alternatives to the large systems built by American corporations. On many occasions in the past, European Union legislation has supported these projects and their principles, for instance with the recently implemented General Data Protection Regulation [4]to ensure high levels of data privacy for EU citizens.

Unfortunately, the planned copyright reform, and especially Article 13, will have an effect exactly opposite to supporting such projects and efforts.

The upload filters both explicitly described in and implied by the text on which you will be voting would force all online platforms to rely on technologies known to be error-prone, intrusive and legally questionable[5]. The proposal intends to hold providers of online platforms accountable for all content uploaded by users as soon as they have been published, contrary to the "notice and takedown" procedure currently in place, which allows providers to remove offending content upon receiving notice without the fear of legal repercussions.

For large platforms like Twitter and YouTube, this change would result in the implementation of stricter upload filters. Due to the technical natures of such systems and the strict liability regulations, those systems will be designed to block "too much", because blocking "too little" would put the provider at risk. Such over-cautious filters are a danger for users' freedom of speech, the diversity of opinions and creativity on the entire Internet, and would limit EU citizens' rights substantially.

Implementing Article 13 in its current form would be the end for smaller platforms and projects, as well as small and medium-sized businesses working on these or similar projects. Although in a previous revision of the proposal, platforms younger than three years, with revenue of less than €10 million, or with fewer than 5 million monthly active users would be excluded, a recent revision of the proposal now only excludes projects that meet all three of these conditions. For projects like diaspora*, which is significantly older than three years, this decision would result in all operators being responsible for every action their users do.

Non-profit projects like diaspora* are developed and maintained by people working voluntarily. Operators of servers running these software projects run those because they deem privacy important and want to provide an alternative to the large networks. They do not earn any money by doing this. The development, embedding and maintenance of infrastructure needed to filter copyright violations automatically requires a lot of resources, and implementing such solutions would thus simply be impossible.

If Article 13 became a reality, these projects and companies would not be able to comply with the new laws, so they could either cease to provide their services to European citizens and move their operations to a country outside the EU or stop their activities altogether. For Europe, especially as a community for strong privacy principles and independent, alternative solutions, this would be a huge step backwards and would make the established large networks, which quite regularly violate European principles, even more powerful.

With this, I am asking you to reject Article 13 of the Copyright Directive and to support all citizens who raise their voice for a free, open and diverse Internet.

Please do not use your vote to destroy the Internet.

Thank you.

Sincerely yours,

Dennis Schubert

[1]: https://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Issues/Opinion/Legislation/OL-OTH-41-2018.pdf
[2]: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diaspora_(software)
[3]: https://the-federation.info/
[4]: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:02016R0679-20160504
[5]: https://static1.squarespace.com/static/571681753c44d835a440c8b5/t/58d058712994ca536bbfa47a/1490049138881/FilteringPaperWebsite.pdf

Standalone Open letter, English Version: https://schub.io/txt/europarl-article13-en.html
Standalone Open letter, German Version: https://schub.io/txt/europarl-article13-de.html
#diaspora #privacy #copyright #europe #article13
 

European Copyright Reform: Article 13 puts alternative social networks at risk


If you live in the European Union, you have probably heard about the planned European Copyright Reform, and you are probably aware of its controversial Article 13.

The so-called Proposal for a Directive on copyright in the Digital Single Market intends to introduce new regulations around copyright. Article 13 would add new liability rules for online content-sharing service providers. While previously, providers could act on content that infringed copyright upon receiving a notice, the proposed regulations would render providers accountable for content as soon as it has been uploaded.

Effectively, this would put providers into a position where they have to implement strict upload filters to prevent users from uploading content that may infringe on someone else's copyright. This is dangerous, and it puts free speech, the diversity of opinions, and the internet as a whole at risk.

Article 13 previously contained rules to exclude platforms younger than three years, generating revenue of less than €10 million or with fewer than 5 million active users. Last week, however, a new draft was published, and the proposal now only excludes platforms matching all three of those conditions.

This is shocking. If Article 13 became a reality, everyone who operates a platform for users to publish content for more than three years would be 100% liable for everything happening on that platform, including content the operators are not even aware of. This makes operating an alternative social network effectively impossible.

For more details about the planned copyright reform, and information on how you can help, please check out saveyourinternet.eu. This does not concern just diaspora\* or your other favorite alternative social network. This concerns everyone. This is about health of the internet. Please #SaveYourInternet and fight against the #CensorshipMachine.

For reference, you will find below an open letter from diappora\* core team member Dennis Schubert, sent to those members of the European Parliament who currently support Article 13.
Dear Member of the European Parliament

The proposed Directive on copyright in the Digital Single Market has been the topic of discussions for many months now. In spite of many debates on this matter, not much progress has been made to address concerns of many respected experts, including many NGOs and even the United Nations' Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression, David Kaye[1]. According to my information, you are in the group of members of the European Parliament currently in favour of supporting this proposal, which is why I am reaching out to you to request you to reconsider the proposal, and especially consider the impact Article 13 will have on the Internet.

I am writing to you as a citizen of the European Union, but I am also reaching out to represent the many users and engineers behind alternative social networks. I am the project lead of diaspora*[2], an alternative, distributed social network based on free and open-source software. Together with similar projects such as Mastodon and Friendica, the world of alternative social media reaches over 2.5 million users on more than 4000 servers, including citizens who are part of your constituency.

Until now, the European Union has been seen as the epicentre of many efforts to build and maintain alternatives to large networks such as Facebook and Twitter. Many of these projects, their developers, and users are citizens of the European Union, and our projects enjoy great popularity among people as they are seen as privacy-friendly, local alternatives to the large systems built by American corporations. On many occasions in the past, European Union legislation has supported these projects and their principles, for instance with the recently implemented General Data Protection Regulation [4]to ensure high levels of data privacy for EU citizens.

Unfortunately, the planned copyright reform, and especially Article 13, will have an effect exactly opposite to supporting such projects and efforts.

The upload filters both explicitly described in and implied by the text on which you will be voting would force all online platforms to rely on technologies known to be error-prone, intrusive and legally questionable[5]. The proposal intends to hold providers of online platforms accountable for all content uploaded by users as soon as they have been published, contrary to the "notice and takedown" procedure currently in place, which allows providers to remove offending content upon receiving notice without the fear of legal repercussions.

For large platforms like Twitter and YouTube, this change would result in the implementation of stricter upload filters. Due to the technical natures of such systems and the strict liability regulations, those systems will be designed to block "too much", because blocking "too little" would put the provider at risk. Such over-cautious filters are a danger for users' freedom of speech, the diversity of opinions and creativity on the entire Internet, and would limit EU citizens' rights substantially.

Implementing Article 13 in its current form would be the end for smaller platforms and projects, as well as small and medium-sized businesses working on these or similar projects. Although in a previous revision of the proposal, platforms younger than three years, with revenue of less than €10 million, or with fewer than 5 million monthly active users would be excluded, a recent revision of the proposal now only excludes projects that meet all three of these conditions. For projects like diaspora*, which is significantly older than three years, this decision would result in all operators being responsible for every action their users do.

Non-profit projects like diaspora* are developed and maintained by people working voluntarily. Operators of servers running these software projects run those because they deem privacy important and want to provide an alternative to the large networks. They do not earn any money by doing this. The development, embedding and maintenance of infrastructure needed to filter copyright violations automatically requires a lot of resources, and implementing such solutions would thus simply be impossible.

If Article 13 became a reality, these projects and companies would not be able to comply with the new laws, so they could either cease to provide their services to European citizens and move their operations to a country outside the EU or stop their activities altogether. For Europe, especially as a community for strong privacy principles and independent, alternative solutions, this would be a huge step backwards and would make the established large networks, which quite regularly violate European principles, even more powerful.

With this, I am asking you to reject Article 13 of the Copyright Directive and to support all citizens who raise their voice for a free, open and diverse Internet.

Please do not use your vote to destroy the Internet.

Thank you.

Sincerely yours,

Dennis Schubert

[1]: https://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Issues/Opinion/Legislation/OL-OTH-41-2018.pdf
[2]: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diaspora_(software)
[3]: https://the-federation.info/
[4]: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:02016R0679-20160504
[5]: https://static1.squarespace.com/static/571681753c44d835a440c8b5/t/58d058712994ca536bbfa47a/1490049138881/FilteringPaperWebsite.pdf

Standalone Open letter, English Version: https://schub.io/txt/europarl-article13-en.html
Standalone Open letter, German Version: https://schub.io/txt/europarl-article13-de.html
#diaspora #privacy #copyright #europe #article13
 

European Copyright Reform: Article 13 puts alternative social networks at risk


If you live in the European Union, you have probably heard about the planned European Copyright Reform, and you are probably aware of its controversial Article 13.

The so-called Proposal for a Directive on copyright in the Digital Single Market intends to introduce new regulations around copyright. Article 13 would add new liability rules for online content-sharing service providers. While previously, providers could act on content that infringed copyright upon receiving a notice, the proposed regulations would render providers accountable for content as soon as it has been uploaded.

Effectively, this would put providers into a position where they have to implement strict upload filters to prevent users from uploading content that may infringe on someone else's copyright. This is dangerous, and it puts free speech, the diversity of opinions, and the internet as a whole at risk.

Article 13 previously contained rules to exclude platforms younger than three years, generating revenue of less than €10 million or with fewer than 5 million active users. Last week, however, a new draft was published, and the proposal now only excludes platforms matching all three of those conditions.

This is shocking. If Article 13 became a reality, everyone who operates a platform for users to publish content for more than three years would be 100% liable for everything happening on that platform, including content the operators are not even aware of. This makes operating an alternative social network effectively impossible.

For more details about the planned copyright reform, and information on how you can help, please check out saveyourinternet.eu. This does not concern just diaspora\* or your other favorite alternative social network. This concerns everyone. This is about health of the internet. Please #SaveYourInternet and fight against the #CensorshipMachine.

For reference, you will find below an open letter from diappora\* core team member Dennis Schubert, sent to those members of the European Parliament who currently support Article 13.
Dear Member of the European Parliament

The proposed Directive on copyright in the Digital Single Market has been the topic of discussions for many months now. In spite of many debates on this matter, not much progress has been made to address concerns of many respected experts, including many NGOs and even the United Nations' Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression, David Kaye[1]. According to my information, you are in the group of members of the European Parliament currently in favour of supporting this proposal, which is why I am reaching out to you to request you to reconsider the proposal, and especially consider the impact Article 13 will have on the Internet.

I am writing to you as a citizen of the European Union, but I am also reaching out to represent the many users and engineers behind alternative social networks. I am the project lead of diaspora*[2], an alternative, distributed social network based on free and open-source software. Together with similar projects such as Mastodon and Friendica, the world of alternative social media reaches over 2.5 million users on more than 4000 servers, including citizens who are part of your constituency.

Until now, the European Union has been seen as the epicentre of many efforts to build and maintain alternatives to large networks such as Facebook and Twitter. Many of these projects, their developers, and users are citizens of the European Union, and our projects enjoy great popularity among people as they are seen as privacy-friendly, local alternatives to the large systems built by American corporations. On many occasions in the past, European Union legislation has supported these projects and their principles, for instance with the recently implemented General Data Protection Regulation [4]to ensure high levels of data privacy for EU citizens.

Unfortunately, the planned copyright reform, and especially Article 13, will have an effect exactly opposite to supporting such projects and efforts.

The upload filters both explicitly described in and implied by the text on which you will be voting would force all online platforms to rely on technologies known to be error-prone, intrusive and legally questionable[5]. The proposal intends to hold providers of online platforms accountable for all content uploaded by users as soon as they have been published, contrary to the "notice and takedown" procedure currently in place, which allows providers to remove offending content upon receiving notice without the fear of legal repercussions.

For large platforms like Twitter and YouTube, this change would result in the implementation of stricter upload filters. Due to the technical natures of such systems and the strict liability regulations, those systems will be designed to block "too much", because blocking "too little" would put the provider at risk. Such over-cautious filters are a danger for users' freedom of speech, the diversity of opinions and creativity on the entire Internet, and would limit EU citizens' rights substantially.

Implementing Article 13 in its current form would be the end for smaller platforms and projects, as well as small and medium-sized businesses working on these or similar projects. Although in a previous revision of the proposal, platforms younger than three years, with revenue of less than €10 million, or with fewer than 5 million monthly active users would be excluded, a recent revision of the proposal now only excludes projects that meet all three of these conditions. For projects like diaspora*, which is significantly older than three years, this decision would result in all operators being responsible for every action their users do.

Non-profit projects like diaspora* are developed and maintained by people working voluntarily. Operators of servers running these software projects run those because they deem privacy important and want to provide an alternative to the large networks. They do not earn any money by doing this. The development, embedding and maintenance of infrastructure needed to filter copyright violations automatically requires a lot of resources, and implementing such solutions would thus simply be impossible.

If Article 13 became a reality, these projects and companies would not be able to comply with the new laws, so they could either cease to provide their services to European citizens and move their operations to a country outside the EU or stop their activities altogether. For Europe, especially as a community for strong privacy principles and independent, alternative solutions, this would be a huge step backwards and would make the established large networks, which quite regularly violate European principles, even more powerful.

With this, I am asking you to reject Article 13 of the Copyright Directive and to support all citizens who raise their voice for a free, open and diverse Internet.

Please do not use your vote to destroy the Internet.

Thank you.

Sincerely yours,

Dennis Schubert

[1]: https://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Issues/Opinion/Legislation/OL-OTH-41-2018.pdf
[2]: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diaspora_(software)
[3]: https://the-federation.info/
[4]: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:02016R0679-20160504
[5]: https://static1.squarespace.com/static/571681753c44d835a440c8b5/t/58d058712994ca536bbfa47a/1490049138881/FilteringPaperWebsite.pdf

Standalone Open letter, English Version: https://schub.io/txt/europarl-article13-en.html
Standalone Open letter, German Version: https://schub.io/txt/europarl-article13-de.html
#diaspora #privacy #copyright #europe #article13
 

European Copyright Reform: Article 13 puts alternative social networks at risk


If you live in the European Union, you have probably heard about the planned European Copyright Reform, and you are probably aware of its controversial Article 13.

The so-called Proposal for a Directive on copyright in the Digital Single Market intends to introduce new regulations around copyright. Article 13 would add new liability rules for online content-sharing service providers. While previously, providers could act on content that infringed copyright upon receiving a notice, the proposed regulations would render providers accountable for content as soon as it has been uploaded.

Effectively, this would put providers into a position where they have to implement strict upload filters to prevent users from uploading content that may infringe on someone else's copyright. This is dangerous, and it puts free speech, the diversity of opinions, and the internet as a whole at risk.

Article 13 previously contained rules to exclude platforms younger than three years, generating revenue of less than €10 million or with fewer than 5 million active users. Last week, however, a new draft was published, and the proposal now only excludes platforms matching all three of those conditions.

This is shocking. If Article 13 became a reality, everyone who operates a platform for users to publish content for more than three years would be 100% liable for everything happening on that platform, including content the operators are not even aware of. This makes operating an alternative social network effectively impossible.

For more details about the planned copyright reform, and information on how you can help, please check out saveyourinternet.eu. This does not concern just diaspora* or your other favorite alternative social network. This concerns everyone. This is about health of the internet. Please #SaveYourInternet and fight against the #CensorshipMachine.

For reference, you will find below an open letter from diappora* core team member Dennis Schubert, sent to those members of the European Parliament who currently support Article 13.
Dear Member of the European Parliament

The proposed Directive on copyright in the Digital Single Market has been the topic of discussions for many months now. In spite of many debates on this matter, not much progress has been made to address concerns of many respected experts, including many NGOs and even the United Nations' Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression, David Kaye[1]. According to my information, you are in the group of members of the European Parliament currently in favour of supporting this proposal, which is why I am reaching out to you to request you to reconsider the proposal, and especially consider the impact Article 13 will have on the Internet.

I am writing to you as a citizen of the European Union, but I am also reaching out to represent the many users and engineers behind alternative social networks. I am the project lead of diaspora*[2], an alternative, distributed social network based on free and open-source software. Together with similar projects such as Mastodon and Friendica, the world of alternative social media reaches over 2.5 million users on more than 4000 servers, including citizens who are part of your constituency.

Until now, the European Union has been seen as the epicentre of many efforts to build and maintain alternatives to large networks such as Facebook and Twitter. Many of these projects, their developers, and users are citizens of the European Union, and our projects enjoy great popularity among people as they are seen as privacy-friendly, local alternatives to the large systems built by American corporations. On many occasions in the past, European Union legislation has supported these projects and their principles, for instance with the recently implemented General Data Protection Regulation [4]to ensure high levels of data privacy for EU citizens.

Unfortunately, the planned copyright reform, and especially Article 13, will have an effect exactly opposite to supporting such projects and efforts.

The upload filters both explicitly described in and implied by the text on which you will be voting would force all online platforms to rely on technologies known to be error-prone, intrusive and legally questionable[5]. The proposal intends to hold providers of online platforms accountable for all content uploaded by users as soon as they have been published, contrary to the "notice and takedown" procedure currently in place, which allows providers to remove offending content upon receiving notice without the fear of legal repercussions.

For large platforms like Twitter and YouTube, this change would result in the implementation of stricter upload filters. Due to the technical natures of such systems and the strict liability regulations, those systems will be designed to block "too much", because blocking "too little" would put the provider at risk. Such over-cautious filters are a danger for users' freedom of speech, the diversity of opinions and creativity on the entire Internet, and would limit EU citizens' rights substantially.

Implementing Article 13 in its current form would be the end for smaller platforms and projects, as well as small and medium-sized businesses working on these or similar projects. Although in a previous revision of the proposal, platforms younger than three years, with revenue of less than €10 million, or with fewer than 5 million monthly active users would be excluded, a recent revision of the proposal now only excludes projects that meet all three of these conditions. For projects like diaspora*, which is significantly older than three years, this decision would result in all operators being responsible for every action their users do.

Non-profit projects like diaspora* are developed and maintained by people working voluntarily. Operators of servers running these software projects run those because they deem privacy important and want to provide an alternative to the large networks. They do not earn any money by doing this. The development, embedding and maintenance of infrastructure needed to filter copyright violations automatically requires a lot of resources, and implementing such solutions would thus simply be impossible.

If Article 13 became a reality, these projects and companies would not be able to comply with the new laws, so they could either cease to provide their services to European citizens and move their operations to a country outside the EU or stop their activities altogether. For Europe, especially as a community for strong privacy principles and independent, alternative solutions, this would be a huge step backwards and would make the established large networks, which quite regularly violate European principles, even more powerful.

With this, I am asking you to reject Article 13 of the Copyright Directive and to support all citizens who raise their voice for a free, open and diverse Internet.

Please do not use your vote to destroy the Internet.

Thank you.

Sincerely yours,

Dennis Schubert

[1]: https://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Issues/Opinion/Legislation/OL-OTH-41-2018.pdf
[2]: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diaspora_(software)
[3]: https://the-federation.info/
[4]: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:02016R0679-20160504
[5]: https://static1.squarespace.com/static/571681753c44d835a440c8b5/t/58d058712994ca536bbfa47a/1490049138881/FilteringPaperWebsite.pdf

Standalone Open letter, English Version: https://schub.io/txt/europarl-article13-en.html
Standalone Open letter, German Version: https://schub.io/txt/europarl-article13-de.html
#diaspora #privacy #copyright #europe #article13

European Copyright Reform: Article 13 puts alternative social networks at risk


If you live in the European Union, you have probably heard about the planned European Copyright Reform, and you are probably aware of its controversial Article 13.

The so-called Proposal for a Directive on copyright in the Digital Single Market intends to introduce new regulations around copyright. Article 13 would add new liability rules for online content-sharing service providers. While previously, providers could act on content that infringed copyright upon receiving a notice, the proposed regulations would render providers accountable for content as soon as it has been uploaded.

Effectively, this would put providers into a position where they have to implement strict upload filters to prevent users from uploading content that may infringe on someone else's copyright. This is dangerous, and it puts free speech, the diversity of opinions, and the internet as a whole at risk.

Article 13 previously contained rules to exclude platforms younger than three years, generating revenue of less than €10 million or with fewer than 5 million active users. Last week, however, a new draft was published, and the proposal now only excludes platforms matching all three of those conditions.

This is shocking. If Article 13 became a reality, everyone who operates a platform for users to publish content for more than three years would be 100% liable for everything happening on that platform, including content the operators are not even aware of. This makes operating an alternative social network effectively impossible.

For more details about the planned copyright reform, and information on how you can help, please check out saveyourinternet.eu. This does not concern just diaspora* or your other favorite alternative social network. This concerns everyone. This is about health of the internet. Please #SaveYourInternet and fight against the #CensorshipMachine.

For reference, you will find below an open letter from diappora* core team member Dennis Schubert, sent to those members of the European Parliament who currently support Article 13.
Dear Member of the European Parliament

The proposed Directive on copyright in the Digital Single Market has been the topic of discussions for many months now. In spite of many debates on this matter, not much progress has been made to address concerns of many respected experts, including many NGOs and even the United Nations' Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Expression, David Kaye[1]. According to my information, you are in the group of members of the European Parliament currently in favour of supporting this proposal, which is why I am reaching out to you to request you to reconsider the proposal, and especially consider the impact Article 13 will have on the Internet.

I am writing to you as a citizen of the European Union, but I am also reaching out to represent the many users and engineers behind alternative social networks. I am the project lead of diaspora*[2], an alternative, distributed social network based on free and open-source software. Together with similar projects such as Mastodon and Friendica, the world of alternative social media reaches over 2.5 million users on more than 4000 servers, including citizens who are part of your constituency.

Until now, the European Union has been seen as the epicentre of many efforts to build and maintain alternatives to large networks such as Facebook and Twitter. Many of these projects, their developers, and users are citizens of the European Union, and our projects enjoy great popularity among people as they are seen as privacy-friendly, local alternatives to the large systems built by American corporations. On many occasions in the past, European Union legislation has supported these projects and their principles, for instance with the recently implemented General Data Protection Regulation [4]to ensure high levels of data privacy for EU citizens.

Unfortunately, the planned copyright reform, and especially Article 13, will have an effect exactly opposite to supporting such projects and efforts.

The upload filters both explicitly described in and implied by the text on which you will be voting would force all online platforms to rely on technologies known to be error-prone, intrusive and legally questionable[5]. The proposal intends to hold providers of online platforms accountable for all content uploaded by users as soon as they have been published, contrary to the "notice and takedown" procedure currently in place, which allows providers to remove offending content upon receiving notice without the fear of legal repercussions.

For large platforms like Twitter and YouTube, this change would result in the implementation of stricter upload filters. Due to the technical natures of such systems and the strict liability regulations, those systems will be designed to block "too much", because blocking "too little" would put the provider at risk. Such over-cautious filters are a danger for users' freedom of speech, the diversity of opinions and creativity on the entire Internet, and would limit EU citizens' rights substantially.

Implementing Article 13 in its current form would be the end for smaller platforms and projects, as well as small and medium-sized businesses working on these or similar projects. Although in a previous revision of the proposal, platforms younger than three years, with revenue of less than €10 million, or with fewer than 5 million monthly active users would be excluded, a recent revision of the proposal now only excludes projects that meet all three of these conditions. For projects like diaspora*, which is significantly older than three years, this decision would result in all operators being responsible for every action their users do.

Non-profit projects like diaspora* are developed and maintained by people working voluntarily. Operators of servers running these software projects run those because they deem privacy important and want to provide an alternative to the large networks. They do not earn any money by doing this. The development, embedding and maintenance of infrastructure needed to filter copyright violations automatically requires a lot of resources, and implementing such solutions would thus simply be impossible.

If Article 13 became a reality, these projects and companies would not be able to comply with the new laws, so they could either cease to provide their services to European citizens and move their operations to a country outside the EU or stop their activities altogether. For Europe, especially as a community for strong privacy principles and independent, alternative solutions, this would be a huge step backwards and would make the established large networks, which quite regularly violate European principles, even more powerful.

With this, I am asking you to reject Article 13 of the Copyright Directive and to support all citizens who raise their voice for a free, open and diverse Internet.

Please do not use your vote to destroy the Internet.

Thank you.

Sincerely yours,

Dennis Schubert

[1]: https://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Issues/Opinion/Legislation/OL-OTH-41-2018.pdf
[2]: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diaspora_(software)
[3]: https://the-federation.info/
[4]: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:02016R0679-20160504
[5]: https://static1.squarespace.com/static/571681753c44d835a440c8b5/t/58d058712994ca536bbfa47a/1490049138881/FilteringPaperWebsite.pdf

Standalone Open letter, English Version: https://schub.io/txt/europarl-article13-en.html
Standalone Open letter, German Version: https://schub.io/txt/europarl-article13-de.html
#diaspora #privacy #copyright #europe #article13
 
Signal Messenger Has A Clever New Way To Shield Your Identity - A "sealed sender" Feature

A key part of what makes Signal the leading encrypted messaging app is its effort to minimize the amount of data or metadata each message leaves behind. The messages themselves are fully encrypted as they move across Signal's infrastructure, and the service doesn't store logs of information like who sends messages to each other, or when. On Monday, the nonprofit that develops Signal announced a new initiative to take those protections even further. Now, it hopes to encrypt even information about which users are messaging each other on the platform.

"While the service always needs to know where a message should be delivered, ideally it shouldn’t need to know who the sender is," Moxie Marlinspike, the creator of Signal, wrote on Monday. "It would be better if the service could handle packages where only the destination is written on the outside, with a blank space where the 'from' address used to be."

See https://www.wired.com/story/signal-sealed-sender-encrypted-messaging/

#signal #privacy
 
Hello world! Happy to finally be part of the Mastodon community. Follow us if you are interested in #privacy #personaldata #dataexploitation and #surveillance, we'll be talking a lot about these.

#newcomer #presentation
 
Smart TVs not only capture and sell your data like a phone, now they are paid to pre-install crashy spyware apps you can't remove just like a phone. #privacy https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2019/01/smart-tvs-are-dumb/581059/
 
🎁 Buy Now & Save: Librem 5 Early Bird pricing ($599 USD) *extended to February 3*. Preorder pricing ($649 USD) begins Feb 4 and ends when general availability and shipping begins. https://shop.puri.sm/shop/librem-5/ #DemandFreedom #privacy #security
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Who has pre-ordered this phone? The price is a little high, but you can update it as long as you own it, unlike other cellphones that block updates after two years. Thinking about getting one maybe by July when it's been out for a few months.
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Librem 5

#phone #cellphone #technology #librem5 #purism #pureos #opensource #crowdfunded #privacy #security
 
Listen to our CEO Todd Weaver talk about Purism, the background, and the history on how we got started - https://www.tastytrade.com/tt/shows/bootstrapping-in-america/episodes/bootstrapping-in-america-01-28-2019 Bonus: Know Todd's thoughts on Apple's #privacy marketing #DemandFreedom
 
We believe in a decentralized Internet #fediverse. That's why we're at #Mastodon now!#Introduction #Privacy #Security
 
Q. What should I use to protect myself from surveillance on a Chromebook?

A. A hammer.

#Privacy #SurveillanceCapitalism
 

Sharing Photos In Private Posts


When you share public posts, photos are transferred to users of other systems along with the text of the post. Occasionally a photo gets lost along the way, but that's no issue with authentication, but with federation.

Things change, when you share a private post with photos.

On Diaspora you can have EXIFs automatically removed from your photos in the settings section. You always upload a photo into a specific post. The photo is assigned a link and the photo is public. Yet the link to a photo contains a long string of random characters, so the photo is hard to find.

Friendica and Hubzilla have photo albums. So users can upload photos into posts or into photo albums. That means the access to a post and the access to photos are controlled independently. Friendica and Hubzilla also do not automatically remove EXIFs from photos. Depending on your settings EXIFs can reveal the time the photo was taken, the camera model and the location. EXIFs can be removed before uploading a photo.

If a friendica or Hubzilla user uploads a photo into a private post, the access to the photo will be private too. Unfortunately that doesn't work across networks. If a friendica user makes a private post with a private photo, Hubzilla and Diaspora users will see the text of the post, but will only see a placeholder instead of the photo. It's the same for Hubzilla users sending to friendica and Diaspora.

So what can Hubzilla or friendica users do, if they want to share a private post with a photo across the network?

They can upload the photo first and make it public, then the photo can be seen by anyone looking at their photo albums in their account. That may be fine if the photo shows something mundane that only becomes personal in the context of the post. They can upload the photo to some other place (Nextcloud, own website, PixelFed,...) and embed it into their private post. That means the photo will not show up in the albums of the account.

Hubzilla users can make their private post with photos accessible with a guest access token. That means they create a link that allows access to their channel and shows the private post with photos to anyone who has the link. They can set that guest access token to expire after a certain time. I have used this option and I think it's one of the coolest features of Hubzilla. The photos remain private and even if the link ends up in the wrong place, the access to the post has a time limit as an additional safety feature. In addition the token links to the channel, which means one will see all public posts and the private post(s) that are allowed with the token. In other words a visitor will end up looking at news and flower photos, scrolling, and not knowing what to look for unless he got some info what the post is supposed to be about and how old it is. If the token has expired, the post in question will just have vanished. All the other posts will still be there.

You'll find more notes about this topic here:

https://hubzilla.a-zwenkau.de/channel/anna?f=&cat=Decentralized

#Diaspora #friendica #Hubzilla #photos #privacy
 
RT @CCC_CH Artikel "Wanze im Hosensack" von @vecirex für den #CCCCH im #megafon
 
Hardware Updates for 2019! 🎉

Today we introduce Version 4 of the Librem laptop line — now with an updated CPU and graphics for all models and a 4k/HiDPI screen for the 15″ model.

https://puri.sm/posts/librem-laptops-now-at-version-4/

Protect your digital life with strong #security and #privacy *and* do so on one of our beautiful, high-end laptops.
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🎁 Buy Now & Save: Librem 5 Early Bird pricing ($599 USD) ends January 31. Preorder pricing ($649 USD) begins Feb 1 and ends when general availability and shipping begins. https://shop.puri.sm/shop/librem-5/ #DemandFreedom #privacy #security
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How to Encrypt Your DNS With DNSCrypt on Ubuntu and Debian - Because all your web browsing is an Open Book Otherwise

The topic recently came up again about whether a foreign (anyone outside of your own country... or actually even in your own country) agency is tapping into or mining data from your phone. The easy answer (my opinion only) is that yes if you are being targeted for something specific and if the German Chancellor's phone can be bugged by the USA, anyone can bug your personal phone) but no, they would not go to the trouble for each phone if they are scanning masses of data for patterns or vulnerabilities.

The easier way is to spend some effort on hacking a treasure trove of information that is more publicly accessible. So think DNS (domain name lookups) for all sites you and everyone else visits and these are in open text (usually), or hacking Facebook (or just spending money and buying private data from Facebook or similar), or hacking a major ISP where thousands of people's data pass through every day. They go where they can get the most information for the least effort. That's the plain economics of hacking.

DNS (a very old Internet technology) is but one area where you can tighten things down yourself and create less exposure externally. If say a foreign (or local) power wanted to identify everyone who visited the Jolly Roger Website they could either hack the Jolly Roger Website and try find out who arrives there, or they could scan network traffic via major ISPs and see who visits the site that way. The nature of Internet traffic is that for information to travel back to your computer from any site you visit, means that every packet you send out from your computer also contains your "return address" for that information to reach you (much like posting a letter where you put your return address on the outside at the back so the letter can get back to you if it is undelivered - everyone sees that address).

So all encrypted DNS is doing, is to "put everything inside the envelope". But it is still not 100% secure as the postman (or "person" - the encrypted DNS server) does have keys to open that envelope to read the addresses otherwise they cannot deliver it and return the data, but no-one else sees it while en route.

DNSCrypt encrypts your DNS traffic automatically and sends it to DNS servers that also use encryption. This way, the entire transaction remains encrypted throughout. Not even your ISP will be able to see where you're browsing. DNSCrypt is actually one of the easiest services that you can set up on Linux, so there's really no reason not to use it.

See https://linuxconfig.org/how-to-encrypt-your-dns-with-dnscrypt-on-ubuntu-and-debian

#privacy #encryption #DNScrypt #encrypt #dns #dnscrypt #ubuntu #debian #linux #howtoencryptdns
 
Every tech company: "We value your #privacy..."

...so much that we made our business model around selling it for profit.
 
Hey everyone, I’m #newhere. I’m interested in #coop, #federated, #linux, #opensource, and #privacy.
 
#ZDF published an article for helping their readers to protect their #privacy on #Android by introducing them to @fdroidorg .
 
#privacy #secure #replicant #GNU #Linux #PlasmaMobile #PostmarketOS #CopperheadOS #LineageOS #eProject #MerProject #Halium #Librem5 #eFoundation #NecunosMobile #pmOS

Какой смартфон лучше купить. Советы спецэксперта. Бомба!

Какую модель смартфона и планшета лучше выбрать. Обзор и мнение эксперта. Android решения: Replicant https://replicant.us Бескомпромисный вариант, свободный ...
youtu.be
 
Bild/Fotohoergen schrieb den folgenden Beitrag Mon, 10 Dec 2018 20:47:23 +0100

Meeting Snowden | Doku | ARTEhttps://pe.ertu.be/videos/watch/f37f754b-0838-4f73-a8d7-d37d4da11b2e\#Dokumentation #Privacy #NSA #Geheimdienst
 
Bild/Fotohoergen schrieb den folgenden Beitrag Mon, 10 Dec 2018 20:47:23 +0100

Meeting Snowden | Doku | ARTEhttps://pe.ertu.be/videos/watch/f37f754b-0838-4f73-a8d7-d37d4da11b2e\#Dokumentation #Privacy #NSA #Geheimdienst
 
Your Medical Devices Are Not Keeping Your Health Data to Themselves — ProPublica - https://www.propublica.org/article/your-medical-devices-are-not-keeping-your-health-data-to-themselves #privacy
 

A #spyware level comparison between #web #browsers


For general details, see the #publicdomain source: https://spyware.neocities.org/articles/browsers.html
For the spyware.neocities.org article discussing a concrete browser from the list below, click on its icon.

Top Tier - Recommended for regular usage.


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High Tier - Recommended, with slight caveats.


Bild/Foto Bild/Foto Bild/Foto Bild/Foto

Mid Tier - Significant privacy, usability, and/or trust issues.


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Low Tier - Huge privacy AND trust issues.


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Shit Tier - #Botnet web browsers


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#privacy #GNU #IceCat #Firefox #Google #Chrome #Chromium #Microsoft #Internet #Explorer #Opera #qutebrowser #falkon #PaleMoon #WaterFox #Brave #Vivaldi #www
 

A #spyware level comparison between #web #browsers


For general details, see the #publicdomain source: https://spyware.neocities.org/articles/browsers.html
For the spyware.neocities.org article discussing a concrete browser from the list below, click on its icon.

Top Tier - Recommended for regular usage.


Bild/Foto Bild/Foto

High Tier - Recommended, with slight caveats.


Bild/Foto Bild/Foto Bild/Foto Bild/Foto

Mid Tier - Significant privacy, usability, and/or trust issues.


Bild/Foto Bild/Foto Bild/Foto

Low Tier - Huge privacy AND trust issues.


Bild/Foto Bild/Foto

Shit Tier - #Botnet web browsers


Bild/Foto Bild/Foto Bild/Foto Bild/Foto Bild/Foto

#privacy #GNU #IceCat #Firefox #Google #Chrome #Chromium #Microsoft #Internet #Explorer #Opera #qutebrowser #falkon #PaleMoon #WaterFox #Brave #Vivaldi #www
 
Standortdaten: Beschwerde gegen Google in sieben Staaten Europas – https://netzpolitik.org/2018/standortdaten-beschwerde-gegen-google-in-sieben-staaten-europas/ #konsumentenschutz #Privacy-by-Design #standortdaten #DarkPatterns #Einwilligung #Datenschutz #Tracking #Nudging #google #DSGVO #beuc
 
#Briar is an unusual kind of messenger for Android devices: there are no servers, messages are stored on your phone and sent directly to your contact's phone through TOR, wi-fi or bluetooth.

It's designed for journalists, activists, people working in disaster zones and anyone interested in "off the grid" communication.

The official site is here:

https://briarproject.org

The app is free, open source and available through @fdroidorg and Google Play.

#AlternativesAtoZ #Privacy #MeshNetworks
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Looking for a new #Tor Exit

I'll give it a try the other way around, I need a low resource (1 or 2 core, 2GB Ram) server with high bandwidth and at least 60TB traffic per month.

We can put up sponsoring information, we can also accept a server donated and can issue a donations receipt that will be accepted by German tax and revenue office (Finanzamt) over the listed amount in Euro.

We need an IPv4 and IPv6 address, there will be abuse mails coming, we would be happy to handle them for you directly!

Please share this post!

#privacy #tor #freedom @utzer
 
Another good take on the "Nothing to hide" argument by Bruce Schneier:
For social norms to change, people need to deviate from these inherited norms. People need the space to try alternate ways of living without risking arrest or social ostracization. People need to be able to read critiques of those norms without anyone’s knowledge, discuss them without their opinions being recorded, and write about their experiences without their names attached to their words. People need to be able to do things that others find distasteful, or even immoral. The minority needs protection from the tyranny of the majority.
https://www.wired.com/story/mcsweeneys-excerpt-the-right-to-experiment/

#society #culture #privacy #surveillance #tyranny #media #censorship #politics #nothingtohide #social #norm #norms #socialnorms #freedom #community #minority #minorities #majority
 
Another good take on the "Nothing to hide" argument by Bruce Schneier:
For social norms to change, people need to deviate from these inherited norms. People need the space to try alternate ways of living without risking arrest or social ostracization. People need to be able to read critiques of those norms without anyone’s knowledge, discuss them without their opinions being recorded, and write about their experiences without their names attached to their words. People need to be able to do things that others find distasteful, or even immoral. The minority needs protection from the tyranny of the majority.
https://www.wired.com/story/mcsweeneys-excerpt-the-right-to-experiment/

#society #culture #privacy #surveillance #tyranny #media #censorship #politics #nothingtohide #social #norm #norms #socialnorms #freedom #community #minority #minorities #majority
 
The Best #Private #Search Engines That Respect Your #Privacy
 
I'm just wanted to point out the difference between open source vs. proprietary specifically to you and in general for other readers since you are tagging this with privacy which I'm following... also when it comes to #privacy other stuff usually follows with it like Free Open Source Software vs proprietary.
 
I was using the Brave browser on my iPhone, but thanks to @Jérémie Fontana I found out about https://basicattentiontoken.org and now I switched back to Safari and bought Better Blocker for iOS by @Aral Balkan instead. #privacy #adblocker #ios
 
Did you get notified already? If not - stay tuned, or update manually! #Nextcloud 14.0.1 is available now with over a dozen bugfixes and improvements. Time to get the lastest and greatest in #selfhosted #privacy protected file sync and collaboration!
https://nextcloud.com/install
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